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Messages - Denise Goodman

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1
Theology Forum / Re: Keep it up Richard
« on: November 17, 2014, 11:11:54 AM »
Gary -- I am still awaiting your response to my question about how you see yourself "walking HUMBLY with your God.?

2
Theology Forum / Re: "God's Will Be Done Om Earth As It Is In Heaven "
« on: November 14, 2014, 10:29:58 PM »
I was writing my last post as Richard was doing his thing with the dog and the door.  I got off, and I realized God was explaining his "NO" about Richard, thank you Lord, You, as usual, are a 100% right ~!~

Gary -- I'm sure God is relieved that you have graded Her "100 % right." Good thing you are on God's  case to make assess the correctness of God's actions.  In all your perusal of scripture have you somehow missed the commandment to "love justice, seek kindness and walk HUMBLY with your God"?  It's in the book of Micah should you want to look it up.

3
UCC Café / Re: Share some daily Humor
« on: May 22, 2014, 10:14:52 PM »
A woman went to a newspaper to place an obituary after the death of her husband. She had written a glowing four page
obituary. The clerk said, "Ma’am, you should know that it costs $.50 a word to put that in the paper." Stunned, the
wife took it back and re-wrote it. It now said, "Sam Brown dies." The clerk said, "I’m sorry ma’am, but there’s a 7-word minimum.” The widow took it back & counting on her fingers wrote: “Sam Brown dies... ’98 Ford for sale."

4
UCC in the News / NC Suit
« on: April 29, 2014, 06:09:23 AM »
http://www.ucc.org/news/free-religion-suit-protect-all-faiths-04282014.html

Am I crazy or does this seem like a slam dunk.  How can a state make a religious ceremony (except one that might cause physical harm) a criminal act?  Wondering if they arrest pastors in legally dry towns who use real wine in communion observances.

5
UCC Café / Re: Who's missing?
« on: March 24, 2014, 04:25:34 AM »
Missing Bobbi, too.

6
Cindi -- thanks for the Snopes link.  Gary -- best to check things out before spreading false information.  Your apparent intense dislike of "liberals"/Democrats seems to create a big blind spot when it comes to the facts.

7
Theology Forum / Re: Myth
« on: February 03, 2014, 08:19:39 PM »
Gary -- "What does the Lord require but to do justice, love kindness and walk humbly with your God."  You seem to be lacking in the "walk humbly" category.  Your insistence that only you know all truth does not foster useful and thoughtful conversation.

8
UCC Café / Re: Share some daily Humor
« on: December 11, 2013, 09:45:40 PM »
I don't get the humor, Gary.

9
UCC Café / Re: Merry Christmas!
« on: November 27, 2013, 09:12:44 PM »
And on w-a-y too many FM radio stations the all Christmas music began November 1.  I've written several stations to which I usually listen to say I won't be tuning them in until Dec. 23.  I suppose focus groups tell them their format is good for advertisers but it totally turns me off or, should I say, turns them off for me.  There's something spiritually odd about hearing "O Holy Night" while viewing the vestiges of fall foliage.

10
Social Issues and Public Policy / Gun Control II
« on: August 24, 2013, 09:27:50 PM »
Got the warning that it's best to start new topic since there's been such a long hiatus of activity on the former.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/local/antoinette-tuffs-911-call-on-ga-shooting-suspect-is-a-portrait-of-poise-compassion/2013/08/22/c62a6fa2-0b3a-11e3-8974-f97ab3b3c677_story.html

The experience at that Decatur, GA school seems to touch on this issue in several ways.  First, a good woman WITHOUT A GUN defused that situation in a way I doubt any good men or women with guns might have.  Not to say the result would always be the same in another situation.  Second, the gunman had a history of mental illness, had threatened to kill his brother, etc., etc.  How did he obtain that assault weapon and 500 rounds of ammunition?  Would universal background checks have made a difference?  Maybe.

Whatever your conclusion,  God Bless Antionette.

11
Theology Forum / Re: Error-ridden or Inerrant or Something Else
« on: June 18, 2013, 07:26:09 AM »
Pardon me if I say "Snooze."  These discussions seem to get bogged down when posters stray from using the "I" language to the "you" one.  As I've written dozens of times before, seems to me discussion works best when we lay out our views without trying to characterize those of others.  Steven -- just write what you believe. That may well be enlightening. If you or anyone else disagrees with a poster, why not simply say something like, "Well, I have a different take on that."  And then lay out your take. 

12
Theology Forum / Re: Error-ridden or Inerrant or Something Else
« on: June 02, 2013, 08:16:00 AM »
James point -- that some choose to take one verse or two from Leviticus as God's continuing voice while ignoring a host of others -- from eating shellfish to mixing fabrics to stoning or otherwise killing those who disobey these other "purity laws" -- seems right on.  I'm not into lengthy replies, mostly because this seems so simple.  Scripture was written by humans regarding their understanding of their encounter with or experience with God in a certain time, place and culture.  That doesn't mean I don't take Scripture seriously.  Is it Borg who talks about not taking Scripture literally but taking it seriously? I'm with whoever said that.

Steven -- how many sermons have been preached by even the most conservative, dare I say, fundamentalist clergy calling on parishioners to forgo shrimp and lobster and get rid of all polyester-cotton garments? 

13
Theology Forum / Re: Age of Faith, of Belief, of Spirit
« on: April 27, 2013, 08:03:21 PM »
Thanks, Steven, for that thoughtful reply.  I don't think Cox or the others would dismiss the Bible or theological reflection.  What I see/read in them is going deeper in such reflection beyond sometimes near mindless recitation of creeds.  I have heard it said and my scripture reading supports the contention that in the Gospels Jesus said directly and in parable, "Follow me," many times over any exhortation to "believe."

I see the hunger for deeper theological reflection in my own congregation.  Book studies focusing on the work of Marcus Borg and others are well-attended and participation/discussion is robust.  My church also has a midweek "House Church" at the parsonage attended by more than a dozen folks who share communion and reflect on the week's lectionary readings.  Almost all who attend either or both gatherings are energetic thinkers not prone to taking an intellectually easy way out, but asking and reflecting on hard questions and welcoming, not always unchallenged, new theological insights.

I share the sadness at the demise of Bangor Theological Seminary, especially since it welcomed me, as a lay person, to classes. I never felt shunted to the side in favor of ordination-pursuing seminarians. This may be tangential, but in Maine and, I think, some other Conferences (Iowa/Wisconsin), lay academies are offering programs of serious theological reflection.  In fact, Maine's Academy fo Congregational Life and Leadership is now exploring how it may fill some gaps left by BTS's closing such as preparing lay people for licensed ministry.

That is to say, I see signs that there is a growing hunger for theological reflection that goes beyond or apart from creedal recitations and none of it smacks of a slippery slope to a more mindless approach to faith. In fact, what I see is just the opposite -- that hunger to delve deeper rather than skim over.

14
Theology Forum / Re: Age of Faith, of Belief, of Spirit
« on: April 27, 2013, 09:43:21 AM »
I  oversimplified of necessity -- trying to cram the contents of at least four thoughtful books into a readable post.  Still, I find the concepts intriguing, especially the view that the Age of Belief developed more for political than for theological reasons.  The Cox material came from his book The Future of Faith. Obviously, he provides a much more thorough background/historical review than I did or could given my bent toward brevity and the limits of this space.

But one point he makes is the difference between believing in Jesus and believing in the Bible. He seems to argue that the early Christians and the emerging Christians today were focused on believing in Jesus while those in the interim focused more on belief in the Bible.  He doesn't dismiss the Bible but neither does he give the two comparable weight or power in the earliest and latest developments.  He also talks about the growth of Christianity outside Western culture -- in South America and Asia -- again as more comparable to that early period in its diverse ways of worship and following Jesus while acknowledging that some of that development is even more stringently creedal as in African opposition to the developments in the U.S. Episcopal Church.

15
Theology Forum / Age of Faith, of Belief, of Spirit
« on: April 27, 2013, 03:00:22 AM »
Steve's comment --
Quote
I went to college with UCC folks who said they believed in Christ but did not believe in the resurrection or any of the miracles & argued about a lot of other beliefs I had though most Christians believed.

prompts me to ask others to weigh in on what a goodly number of progressive theologians  -- Phyllis Tickle, Diane Butler Bass, Harvey Cox, etc -- now are saying:

-- The the earliest Christians lived in the Age of Faith.  Christianity for them meant following Jesus, not believing in any specific creed, and diverse beliefs and rituals were acceptable.  These theologians point to more recently discovered materials -- the Dead Seas Scrolls, Gospel of Thomas, etc. as the underpinning for this take.  These Christians followed "the Way."
-- Then came the age of Belief -- first (obviously) promulgated by the Roman Catholic Church and in part to compete with the secular Roman Emperor/Empire.  Creeds were developed, these theologians argue, to justify a religious hierarchy that mimicked that secular Empire hierarchy.  Subscribing to creeds became the test of faith -- faith in beliefs rather than in God's revelation through the life of Jesus.
-- That we are now into the Age of Spirit.  They point to the growing number of people who say, "I'm spiritual but I'm not religious,"  (a comment, by the way, that drives Lillian Daniel to distraction for good reason).  These theologians argue that the Age of the Spirit is much closer to that earliest Age of Faith than to the 1500 years or so of the Age of Belief.  If they are correct, the UCC may have been a bit ahead of the curve in being a "non-creedal" denomination.  And yet even in the UCC, many seem to give some litmus test weight to specific creeds or beliefs.

So -- what do you think of this analysis of "the Ages"?

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